9 Types Of Mulch Every Gardener Needs To Know

I really enjoy mulching my flower and vegetable beds. I like the smell of mulch, how it makes my garden beds look and mostly how I know that it will break down and do wonders for the soil and the plants. The main reason I mulch is to keep the soil cool by helping it to retain moisture, suppress unsightly weeds and help to prevent… [read more]

8 Reasons To Create Your Own Herb Spiral + How To Build One

Are fresh herbs not showing up in your dinners as often as you’d like? Buying specialty greens at the grocery store quickly gets expensive, but devoting your backyard to a big herb garden isn’t easy either. And while herbs offer impressive health and flavor benefits, many of these perennial plants are notoriously unruly and can quickly take over your garden space. The solution? Establish a… [read more]

8 Natural Ways To Get Rid Of Earwigs In The Garden

Have you ever been gardening and noticed some hideous reddish, brown bugs dining on your vegetables, or squirming through your soil? These are earwigs, tiny brown creatures that like to eat, fungi, vegetation and organic materials. They are also known as ‘pinching bugs’ or ‘pincher bugs’ because they have pincers on their body. If you use organic mulch in your garden these little insects will… [read more]

9 Reasons To Start Composting With A Bokashi Bucket + How To Get Started

Does your current compost system leave your garden lacking? Are you sick of having to sort out the veggie scraps from meat and dairy products? It might be time to experiment with a more advanced composting system- one that lets you build up your soil without being overly picky about the ingredients, and without producing bad odors in the process. Using a bokashi bucket flips… [read more]

10 Ways To Get Rid Of Japanese Beetles Naturally

The first Japanese beetle found in America was discovered in New Jersey in 1916. Prior to this time, the beetle was only found in Japan where it is not a major pest. In 1937, beetles were discovered in Kentucky. By the 1950’s and the 1960’s the population of beetles rose quickly and spread throughout Kentucky and into other states. The eastern part of the US… [read more]

How To Grow Lemongrass + 6 Brilliant Ways To Use It

Lemongrass is a tropical herb plant, native to Southern Asia that will freeze at temperatures below 15 F. It is a perennial in USDA growing zones 8-11 but other places it will freeze in the winter so it is best to grow in a pot and bring indoors during the cold months. This herb has a powerful taste and aroma of lemon and citrus and… [read more]

9 Reasons To Try Lasagna Gardening & How To Get Started

Conventional gardening, as many people know it, can be back-breaking work. Long hours spent turning up the earth, enriching the soil and weeding endlessly. If someone asked me I would have to say that my least favorite part of gardening is the weeding, what seemed to me for many years, a painful but necessary part of a successful garden. However, when I discovered lasagna gardening,… [read more]

10 Incredible Epsom Salt Uses For Plants & The Garden

Epsom salt is comprised of hydrated magnesium sulfate, a naturally occurring mineral first found in the well waters of Epsom, England. Epsom salt has a variety of home remedy applications – the two most widely known being as a saline laxative and pain reliever. What many people don’t realize is that Epsom salt also has several uses in organic gardening for healthy plants. This article shares… [read more]

How To Grow Ginger & Epic Ways To Use It

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is an amazing spice with a plethora of therapeutic benefits mostly due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Ginger plants can grow up to three feet high and produce 2-5 sections of ginger. One of the oldest medicinal foods, ginger originated in Southeast Asia. It has been part of Chinese and Indian healing practices for a very, very long time. According to Ayurvedic… [read more]

13 Ideas For Turning Your Lawn Into A Vibrant Ecosystem

Travel across America today, and you’re likely to see more of a single plant species than any other. It’s not corn- Kentucky Bluegrass wins the award of being the country’s most cultivated crop. Grassy lawns take up more than three times the space of any other irrigated crop, covering a swath over 31 times as large as Delaware. Endless expanses of well-manicured grass might be… [read more]